Jamaica and the Cayman Islands

posted by: Joan Vine | on: Wednesday, 30 March 2016, 16:48


Jamaica and the Cayman Islands

Jamaica and the Cayman Islands

On 24 July, 1824 the Diocese of Jamaica, which apart from Jamaica itself included the Bahamas and the then British Honduras (now Belize), was established by Letters Patent by King George the Fourth. Dr. Christopher Lipscombe, who was appointed the Bishop, was consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace Chapel on 25 July 1824 and arrived in Jamaica on February 11, 1825.

The Bahamas remained a part of the Jamaican Diocese until its own Diocese was created in 1861, while British Honduras remained under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Jamaica until 1891. In 2001, the title of the ‘Diocese of Jamaica’ was amended to include ‘and the Cayman Islands’ in recognition of the growth of the Anglican Church in those islands since it came under the formal jurisdiction of Jamaica in the 1960’s.

On 24 July, 1824 the Diocese of Jamaica, which apart from Jamaica itself included the Bahamas and the then British Honduras (now Belize), was established by Letters Patent by King George the Fourth. Dr. Christopher Lipscombe, who was appointed the Bishop, was consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace Chapel on 25 July 1824 and arrived in Jamaica on February 11, 1825.

The Bahamas remained a part of the Jamaican Diocese until its own Diocese was created in 1861, while British Honduras remained under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Jamaica until 1891. In 2001, the title of the ‘Diocese of Jamaica’ was amended to include ‘and the Cayman Islands’ in recognition of the growth of the Anglican Church in those islands since it came under the formal jurisdiction of Jamaica in the 1960’s.

The first church to be established was the church of St Jago de la Vega in Spanish Town and this was built sometime between 1661 and 1664 on the ruins of the Spanish Church of the Red Cross which had been destroyed by the invading British troops between 1655 and 1660. It is this church, rebuilt and enlarged in the 18th and 19th centuries which became the Cathedral of the Diocese of Jamaica in 1843. The Cathedral has national and regional significance as it is not only the oldest Anglican cathedral outside of the British isles, but the site it occupies is perhaps the oldest site of continuous Christian worship in this hemisphere as a church stood on that same spot since approximately 1538.

The Anglican Church and the work of the Mother’s Union are very strong in the country. Here are their objectives: The objective of the work of the Mothers’ Union is the advancement of the Christian faith and all that strengthens Christian Family Life. There are currently some 150 braches with a total number of some 4,000 members

Objectives: To encourage young people to join the Mothers’ Union.

To concentrate on branch development through various programmes.

To be involved at the Provincial Level.

To produce and publish the Annual Family Life Magazine

To promote Fund-Raising.

To provide annual training.

To read more of the history of Jamaica and the Cayman islands go here http://www.anglicandioceseja.org/?page_id=50

For more information go to the official MU website: http://www.mothersunion.org/about-us/where-we-work/worldwide/


 Posted: 30 Mar 2016 | There are 0 comments


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